Thursday, August 30, 2018

Interview with Janie Frianz

Today I have the honor of interviewing multi-published author, Janie Franz.

Janie, thank you for your time. Let's begin.


Who are some of your favorite authors?

           

Gregg Hurwitz, Zena Henderson, Mercedes Lackey, Anne McCaffrey, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Clive Cussler, and Nancy Springer, to name a few.



What motivated you to become a writer and at what age?

           

I wrote bits and pieces when I was around 8 or 9 years old. I wrote my first short story when I was 12. I continued to write little short ditties until I wrote the novelette, The Bowdancer. That generated my first full length completed novel, The Wayfarer’s Road. I wrote more and pulled out bits and pieces to expand them into full novels. However, before I was a published novelist, I did a lot of academic editing and non-fiction ghostwriting for clients before I became a freelance journalist.



What 3 words describe you as a person?

           

I’m honest, loyal, and talkative.



What 3 words describe you as a writer?

           

I’m seasoned, creative, and dedicated.



When not writing, how do you spend your time? Hobbies?

           

I petsit/housesit and do academic editing and business ghostwriting. I also do as much dancing as possible, do gardening, see live bands, and explore ruins as I can. I also like good mystery, adventure, and sci-fi movies and I read when I can fit in the time.



Do you remember the first story you ever read, and the impact it had on you?

           

I loved books all my life. Even though my mother only had a third grade education, she wanted me to have books. So at every book fair at school, I always got a bunch, even though we were poor. I usually bought books of short stories. I do remember reading a short chapter book called Blue Willow, a very sad story about a poor little girl and her love of a Blue Willow pattern plate. We had some at home. The book spoke to me because it was about someone like me who had a similar fascination with the plates. But her story was different because her circumstances weren’t like mine.



Describe your desk.

           

I actually have an office in my new rental with a new office chair and ottoman—and even a big table to use as a desk. BUT I still work with my laptop on my lap wit my feet outstretched, either on my bed or on the huge day bed I have in my living room that I use as a couch. I spread all my notes on either side of me. I have lots of pillows against my back and my butt never aches sitting there.



Who is the main character in Ruins Legacy?

           

Kate Ferguson



What’s her story?

           

In Ruins Legacy, she is an anthropology professor at a university in Phoenix AZ.



Where/when does the story take place?

           

Today. Arizona



How did the story come to you?

           

I wrote the first few paragraphs of Ruins Legacy right after I completed Ruins Artifacts, the second book in this series. But it took me six years to do the research I needed to do and let the story change during those years. I knew there would be a third book because there was another story to be told. As I know there will be a book four.



Who is your target audience?

           

Any readers. Surprisingly, I was pigeonholed as a romance author early on. The target audience for most romance readers are 20-40 year old women. Young men read my books. Women of all ages read my books. One of friends gave on of my fantasy books to young son. (She said he skipped over the love scene.)



What makes your book different from other similar ones?

           

I think my background in anthropology helped shape this book and my experience with some native people. Though I’m not a horsewoman, I do appreciate those who are and I respect horses. They figure prominently in this book. Also, there are some psychic and spiritual concepts in this book that are different from other books.



What do your fans mean to you?

           

I’m just happy people read my books and enjoy them. I especially appreciate when they write me about them.

           

Any advice for new writers just beginning this trek down the wonderful world of publishing?

           

Read everything you can and write as much as you can. I found that the more I wrote, whether non-fiction or fiction, the better I became at my craft. When I do academic editing, I have a different voice I am helping someone shape. It’s more formal and intellectual. When I do business ghostwriting, it is often personal as if speaking to someone one-on-one. When I do other types of virtual assistance, I have a very precise and technical tone. And when I write a novel, even they have different voices. My novels have a formal, high fantasy tone with more formal speech. My contemporaries are more informal where I draw from my experiences out in the wide world. So read. And write as much as you can, every day if possible.

Thank you, Janie, for your time and for the in-depth interview. Greatly appreciated.

Janie's next release is book 3 from her Ruins series:



Kate Ferguson’s life is crumbling around her as she is shoved out of her ten-year-old son’s life as he prepares for his testing to be the next shaman. Relegated to babysitting a pregnant woman she doesn’t even know in an unfamiliar place, she is bombarded by her son’s growing abilities and her own, dark secrets, strange revelations, spiritual trials, and an intriguing female ranch hand who challenges everything she knows.

Available at AMAZON | B&N | IBOOKS | KOBO |   

To celebrate, we are offering book 1, Ruins Discovery, at a super deal.
Now ONLY $0.99 for a limited time.
 AMAZON